Field Notes: Native Science Report Blog

NSF inviting input on cyberinfrastructure strategy

The National Science Foundation is soliciting input on Future Needs for Advanced Cyberinfrastructure to Support Science and Engineering.

Responses to this Request for Information will, according to the NSF announcement, “directly inform the shaping of NSF’s investment plans for research cyberinfrastructure – advanced computing; data, software, and networking infrastructure; cybersecurity, and associated workforce development – to revolutionize the frontiers of all science and engineering domains over the next decade and beyond.”

The response deadline is April 5, 2017, 5:00 PM ET.  The Dear Colleague Letter provides full background and the a link to the required submission website: https://www.nsfci2030.org.

White House’s proposed budget targets science

Since the November presidential election, the science community has anxiously worried about the fate of programs and agencies that support and conduct research in the sciences. President Trump’s proposed budget, released this week, offers little reassurance and is already generating a flurry of news stories and commentary.

According to a March 16 New York Times story, the proposed budget “took direct aim at basic scientific and medical research.” While this was anticipated, the story noted that “the extent of the cuts in the proposed budget unveiled early Thursday shocked scientists, researchers and program administrators.” It stated:

“The reductions include $5.8 billion, or 18 percent, from the National Institutes of Health, which fund thousands of researchers working on cancer and other diseases, and $900 million, or a little less than 20 percent, from the Department of Energy’s Office of Science, which funds the national laboratories, considered among the crown jewels of basic research in the world.”

The story noted that the budget reflects an effort to zero-out funding for all climate change research, including within the EPA.

The budget must be passed by Congress and will, as is always the case, undergo significant changes. Indeed, some proposed cuts are already being deemed “non-starters” by several Republican leaders in Congress, particularly cuts to medical research.

Not all agencies are affected equally. Several websites and science advocacy organizations noted that the National Science Foundation was not mentioned in the White House’s budget. “Given the cuts seen for many other federal science agencies…some have seen the omission in the budget outline released today as a blessing,” observed the SAGE-sponsored website, Social Science Space.

Awards for “makers” making a difference

Infosys Foundation USA has launched its second year of the Infy Maker Awards competition to provide $10,000 to adult “makers” who are working on social impact projects. This year’s themes are education, health, environmental sustainability, and combating hunger.

Infosystems Foundation USA is a non-profit organization working to “expand professional development in computer science, coding, and making, especially for educators teaching in historically under-represented schools and communities,“ according to its website.

Applicants are asked to upload a photo and 90 second video and “answer several questions about your project and the problem you’re trying to solve.”

And what, exactly, is a “maker”? Adweek offers this quick definition:

“A convergence of computer hackers and traditional artisans, the niche is established enough to have its own magazine, Make, as well as hands-on Maker Faires that are catnip for DIYers who used to toil in solitude. Makers tap into an American admiration for self-reliance and combine that with open-source learning, contemporary design and powerful personal technology like 3-D printers.”

If that sounds like you or someone you know, the deadline for applying is Feb. 28, 2017.

For more information visit www.infymakers.com

I’m curious: Does this movement resonate in native communities, tribal colleges, and minority-serving colleges? Are there any students or instructors who consider themselves “makers”? Let us know.

New program solicitation announced for NSF’s Faculty Early Career Development Program

The National Science Foundation has issued a new program solicitation for its Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER), which provides support to “early-career” faculty who “have the potential to serve as academic role models in research and education and to lead advances in the mission of their department or organization,” according to the solicitation synopsis.

“Activities pursued by early-career faculty should build a firm foundation for a lifetime of leadership in integrating education and research,” according to the synopsis. “NSF encourages submission of CAREER proposals from early-career faculty at all CAREER-eligible organizations and especially encourages women, members of underrepresented minority groups, and persons with disabilities to apply.”

The solicitation also includes a description of the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE).

The new CAREER program solicitation (NSF 17-537) can be accessed at https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17537/nsf17537.htm

Funding for Alaska Native- and Native Hawaiian-Serving Colleges and Universities announced by USDA

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) has announced $3 million in available funding to support Alaska Native- and Native Hawaiian-Serving (ANNH) colleges and universities.

According to a USDA press release, NIFA’s ANNH Education Grants Program addresses educational needs in the food, agricultural and natural resource systems of the United States. Priority is given to those projects that enhance educational equity for underrepresented students and maximize the development and use of resources to improve food and agricultural sciences teaching programs.

The application deadline is March 21, 2017.

For more information: https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/alaska-native-serving-and-native-hawaiian-serving-institutions-education

National Science Foundation Announces New TCUP Funding Opportunities

Guidelines for funding through the National Science Foundation’s Tribal Colleges and Universities Program (TCUP) have been released, effective for all proposals submitted after January 25, 2016.

According to NSF guidelines, TCUP awards are made to “Tribal Colleges and Universities, Alaska Native-serving institutions, and Native Hawaiian-serving institutions to promote high quality science (including sociology, psychology, anthropology, economics, statistics, and other social and behavioral sciences as well as natural sciences and education disciplines), technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education, research, and outreach.”

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EPSCoR Research Fellows Program

The National Science Foundation is currently accepting proposals for funding through the EPSCoR Research Infrastructure Improvement Track 4: Research Fellows Program.

RII Track-4 “provides opportunities for non-tenured investigators to further develop their individual research potential through extended collaborative visits to the nation’s premier private, governmental, or academic research centers,” according to the solicitation.

Research fellows are expected to “learn new techniques, benefit from access to unique equipment and facilities, and shift their research toward transformative new directions.”

Awards may not exceed $300,000 over a two-year period. The deadline for submission of the full proposal is February 28, 2017.

For more information: https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17509/nsf17509.htm

Student Research Featured in NSF Publication

By looking for signs of life in silt samples, including fly larvae, NSF-supported researchers at Aaniiih Nakoda College can gauge the health of a stream that flows into the Fort Belknap Reservation in Montana. Runoff from a gold mine left the stream polluted with heavy metals. Credit: Rob Margetta, NSF

By looking for signs of life in silt samples, including fly larvae, NSF-supported researchers at Aaniiih Nakoda College can gauge the health of a stream that flows into the Fort Belknap Reservation in Montana. Runoff from a gold mine left the stream polluted with heavy metals.
Credit: Rob Margetta, NSF

Undergraduate research projects at two tribal colleges are currently featured in Discoveries, the National Science Foundation’s news outlet, which spotlights exemplary programs funded by the federal agency.

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