Category Archives: Blog

NSF funds four tribal research centers

The National Science Foundation’s Tribal Colleges and Universities Program has awarded $14 million to tribally controlled colleges to establish four research centers.

These Tribal Enterprise Advancement (TEA) centers, called the “first of their kind,” are expected “to become research and development resources for their reservations and communities,” according the original NSF solicitation.

While the NSF has long supported the development of STEM programs within tribal colleges, the centers were created to “address a critical tribal or community need or focus on a realm of STEM research or design that is beyond the scope of individual research grants or that is of interest to multiple tribes.”

According to an NSF announcement, each of the four funded centers will address environmental, social, educational, and economic challenges within Native communities.

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Big ideas wanted

The National Science Foundation is asking researchers and the public to help identify the “pressing research questions that need to be answered in the coming decade.”

The project, called the NSF 2026 Idea Machine, is intended to identify creative “outside the box” ideas for basic research that can “enable new discoveries that drive the U.S. economy, enhance national security and advance knowledge to sustain the country’s global leadership in science and engineering,” according to the project’s web site.

Submissions to this competition are eligible for cash prizes and public recognition.

The deadline for submission is October 26, 2018.

The Idea Machines web page is keeping a running tally of entries, with 256 submissions as of September 24. Perhaps Indian Country has a few ideas that can be added to this list.

To enter: https://nsf-ideamachine.skild.com/skild2/nsfideamachine/loginPage.action

 

Navajo Technical University receives ABET accreditation

Navajo Technical University, a four-year tribally controlled institution located in Crownpoint, New Mexico, learned this week that its electrical and industrial engineering programs have received ABET accreditation.

ABET accreditation is only awarded to institutions able to meet the rigorous requirements of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, which evaluates programs in the disciplines of applied and natural science, computing, engineering, and engineering technology.

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New Report Examines Language Revitalization on the Fort Berthold Reservation

What does it take to save an endangered language? Is it enough to teach it in the schools? If not, what more is required?

These are some of the questions explored in Taking Back the Language, a new report written by Native Science Report Editor Paul Boyer, and available here. Focusing on over forty years of language revitalization work on the Fort Berthold Reservation of North Dakota, the 20-page report examines the progress made as well as the obstacles encountered by educators and community activists working to teach the tribe’s three languages.

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NSF webinar to discuss funding for Tribal Enterprise Advancement Centers

The National Science Foundation’s Tribal Colleges and Universities Program is hosting a webinar to provide more information about Tribal Enterprise Advancement Centers on Monday, April 30 at 3 p.m. eastern time.

A new addition to TCUP’s solicitation, TEA Centers enable tribal colleges “to become research and development resources for their reservations and communities.”  Specifically, “TEA Centers may address a critical tribal or community need or focus on a realm of STEM research or design that is beyond the scope of individual research grants or that is of interest to multiple tribes.”

The April 30 webinar will discuss what is meant by the term TEA Center, required elements of a center proposal, and examples possible center themes. Chief academic officers are particularly encouraged to participate since they are the suggested PI’s for TEA Center grants, along with other relevant colleagues.

Advance registration for the webinar is not required. Simply use the link below (to see the slides and listen to the conversation) or the call-in number to join.

To join the Webex meeting:

https://nsf.webex.com/nsf/j.php?MTID=mcef28c08888cd8b93ca8e595ac759f5c

Meeting number (access code): 749 044 164 Meeting password: Tcup2018!

Or join by phone:

+1-415-655-0002 US Toll

NSF Video Showcases Work of Tribal Colleges

A new video, released this past weekend by the National Science Foundation, is spotlighting the role of research within tribally controlled colleges.

Focusing on student and faculty research supported by the NSF’s Tribal Colleges and Universities Program (TCUP), the twenty-minute documentary explores how tribal colleges “are providing acclaimed STEM leadership in education and research,” according to the NSF.

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NSF seeking applicants for temporary position in Division of Research on Learning

The NSF/EHR Division of Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings has a search for a program officer in science education.

This temporary position addresses science education broadly. In other words, the candidate can have a specialization in any science or science-related focus, such as science identity. As stated in the job description, the NSF seeks applicants who are able to demonstrate knowledge of, and a record of contributing to, STEM education in the broad area of science learning and teaching; demonstrate knowledge of research related to how educational experiences in K-12 and/or informal settings can enhance STEM workforce and career development; and demonstrate research, analytical and technical writing expertise as evidenced by publications and other documents.

The job posting can be found here: https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/494808400. The closing date for this position is April 23.

 

Submissions invited to NSF “Vizzies Challenge”

The National Science Foundation, in partnership with Popular Science, invites researchers and members of the general public to submit their best science or engineering visualization to this year’s “Vizzies Challenge.”

Visualizations include animations, apps, illustrations, or photographs that help explain scientific or engineering concepts. According to the NSF, they “connect scientists and citizens, creating a universal language that enables people the world over to exchange knowledge and to understand scientific ideas and phenomena.”

Entries may be submitted by individuals or by teams by visiting www.nsf.gov/Vizzies. NSF and PopSci.com will feature the winning entries on their respective web sites. In addition, up to five Experts’ Choice winning entries will receive $2000 each, and up to three People’s Choice winning entries will receive $500 each.

This year’s Vizzies closes April 15.

To learn more about the competition, now in its 16th year, and view previous year’s winners see:  www.nsf.gov/Vizzies.